Faba Bean disease reaction tables/guides

Table 6.1 Faba bean disease reactions

VARIETY Chocolate Spot Ascochyta Foliage Blight Seed Rust
Aquadulce MS MS MS MS
PBA Kareema MS MR-R MR-R MR
Farah S MR-R MR-R S
Fiesta VF S MR MS S
Nura MS-MR MR-R MR-R MR
PBA Rana MS R R MS
PBA Samira MS R R MS

Disease tolerance:

R = resistant

MR = moderately resistant

MS = moderately susceptible

S = susceptible

VS = very susceptible

Table 6.2 Faba bean disease guide summary

Disease Organisms Symptoms Occurrence Hosts Control
Ascochyta
blight
Ascochyta fabae Large, light tan to grey spots on leaves.
Small black fruiting bodies develop
within spots. Centres of lesions may
fall out, leaving holes in leaves. Sunken
lesions on stem similar in colour to leaf
lesions. Brown-black discolouration of
grain
Common in all faba bean growing
areas in southern Aust. Usually the
first disease present in new crops.
Most severe in wet seasons
Faba bean, vetch
Spores spread by
wind and rain
Infected seed
Foliar fungicides
Resistant varieties
Crop rotation
Control volunteer plants
Clean seed
Chocolate
spot
Botrytis fabae
Botrytis cinerea
Passive phase: small chocolate covered
spots scattered over leaves
Aggressive phase: tissue around spots
turn dark grey and black. Leaves die and
blacken
Occurs in all areas where beans are
grown. Disease usually becomes
established in late winter and
becomes more severe as day
temperatures increase during
spring. Can destroy unprotected
crops in wet seasons
Faba bean
Spores spread by
wind and rain
Foliar fungicides
Resistant varieties
Crop rotation
Control volunteer
plants
Rust Uromyces
viciae-fabae
Numerous small, orange-brown rust
pustules, surrounded by a light yellow
halo on the leaves of infected plants
Most prevalent in northern Aust.
Crops usually affected late in the
season
Faba bean Foliar fungicides
Crop rotation
Control volunteer
plants
Stem
nematode
Ditylenchus
dipsaci
Patches of malformed and stunted
plants with curling leaves and watersoak
spots. Stem may die back, turning
reddish-brown colour
Most severe in wet seasons Faba bean, pea,
oat, wild oat
Infected seed
straw or soil.
Nematode can
survive many
years in seed,
straw or soil
Seed test
Crop rotation
Sclerotinia
stem rot
Sclerotinia
trifoliorum var. fabae
Stunting, tip yellowing, small and thick
leaves
Rapid development of disease in
wet, cool conditions
Wide host range.
Foliar form of
disease spread by
air-borne spores.
Fungus survives in
the soil for many
years
Crop rotation
Lower seeding
rates, wider
row spacings
and good weed
control
Subterranean
clover stunt
virus
Virus Infection usually begins close to
ground level and slimy wet rot extends
into stem and down into the roots.
Plants easily pulled from soil and have
blackened base covered with cottony,
white fungus growth. Usually isolated
plants that suddenly wilt and collapse.
Sclerotinia on surface and within stem
turn from white to black
Prevalent in all bean growing areas.
Symptoms appear early on faba
bean
Sub clover, faba
bean, lupin, lentil,
chickpea, lucerne,
soybean
Managing aphids and
weeds
Bean leaf roll
virus
Virus Inter-veinal yellowing, leaf rolling,
stunting, leathery leaves
Occurs in all bean growing areas The host range is
limited to Fabaceae
Managing aphids

RUST OF FABA BEANS

Diseases in Legumes: Field Peas