Chickpea disease reaction tables/guides

Table 5.2 Chickpea variety disease reactions

VARIETY Ascochyta blight foliage Ascochyta blight pod Botrytis grey mould
DESI      
Ambar R S S
Genesis 509 R S MS
Howzat S S MS
Neelam R S S
PBA Maiden MR S S
PBA Slasher R S S
PBA Striker MR S S
KABULI      
Almaz MS S S
Genesis 079 R S S
Genesis 090 R S S
Genesis 114 MS S S
Genesis Kalkee MS S S
PBA Monarch MS S S

Disease tolerance:

R = resistant

MR = moderately resistant

MS = moderately susceptible

S = susceptible

VS = very susceptible

Table 5.3 Chickpea disease guide summary

Disease Organisms Symptoms Occurrence Chickpea Control
Ascochyta
blight
Phoma rabiei
(formerly known as
Ascochyta rabiei)
Pale brown lesions on leaves, stems and
pods. Lesions may have a grey centre
containing small black specks which
are the fruiting bodies. Infected stems
wither and break
Occurs in all regions. Affects both
kabuli and desi types. Most severe
in spring.
Chickpea, most
pulses, including
lentil and faba bean
Seed dressing, foliar
fungicides, rotation,
avoid susceptible
varieties, avoid early
sowing
Grey mould Botrytis cinerea Poor emergence and death of young
plants. Soft rot at the base of the stem.
Grey mould growth on leaves, stems
and pods. Lodging of plants in dense
crops. Discolouration of seed with grey/
black mould
Occurs in all regions. Affects both
kabuli and desi types. Most severe
in wet seasons. Dense crops are
more likely to be affected than thin
crops.
Most pulses,
oilseeds and
broadleaf weeds
Seed dressings, lower
plant densities, avoid
early sowing
Sclerotinia Sclerotinia
sclerotiorum
Scattered dead plants within a crop.
Cottony white fungal growth on the
lower stems of dead plants. Soft rot and
white mould on stems and pods
Occurs in all chickpea growing
regions. Most severe in wet
seasons where chickpea is planted
in fields recently cropped to
chickpea.
Kabuli chickpea,
most pulses
 
Crop rotation. (Seed
dressings of no
benefit)
Damping-off Pythium spp. Poor crop establishment under wet
conditions. Seed rotting in the ground.
Sudden death of young seedlings
Problem in all regions, particularly
in soils that become very wet just
after sowing. More severe on kabuli
than desi chickpea
Kabuli chickpea,
most pulses
Seed dressings, avoid
poorly drained soils
Phytophthora Phytophthora
megasperma
Plants suddenly wither and die,
particularly after water logging. Dark
brown to black discolouration of the
tap root
Most serious disease in northern
Australia. May be a problem in
poorly drained soils in southern
Australia under wet conditions
 
Chickpea, lucerne Resistant varieties
Phoma blight Phoma medicaginis Blackening of the stem near ground
level. Dark, tan coloured lesions on
leaves, stems and pods
Common in most chickpea growing
regions. Most severe in wet
seasons
 
Most legumes Crop rotations
Root lesion
nematode
Pratylenchus thornei
and Pratylenchus
neglectus
Ill-thrift, lack of branching of root
system, small dark stripes on roots
Favoured by wheat in rotation with
chickpea, medic and vetch
Wheat, chickpea,
medic, vetch, narbon
bean
Crop rotation
(predictive soil test
available)
Alfalfa
mosaic
virus
Virus Tip necrosis Occurs in all chickpea growing
areas
Wide host range
including most
pulses, some
horticultural plants
and weeds
Virus-free seed
Resistant varieties
Cucumber
mosaic
virus
Virus Yellowing, stunting, offshoots Prevalent in chickpea growing
regions
Very wide host
range, including most
pulses, pastures,
horticultural crops
and weeds
Virus-free seed
Resistant
varieties
Beet
western
yellows
virus
Virus Yellowing, stunting, offshoots Occurs in all chickpea growing
areas
Very wide host
range, including
most pulses,
brassicas and weeds
Managing aphids
and weeds, resistant
varieties

DAMPING-OFF OF CHICKPEAS AND OTHER ROOT DISEASES

Diseases in Pulses: Faba Beans